Tag Archives: young learners

Teaching Materials Series: Videos

People get tetchy at the mention of using videos in the classroom – and sure, there’s little educational value in learners zoning out in front of a cartoon with no context! But done right, video is a great way to engage learners, enlarge their horizons and – our crucial aim here at Struck Fluent – encourage them to produce language.

Here are a few of our fave video resources and how we use them:

TED talks

A language teacher’s manna from heaven, TED offer engaging material on a host of topics from social issues to environmental concerns; from philosophy to the latest scientific research. In other words, material to suit the needs and interests of every learner – this is great news for us as we’re all about tailoring our sessions to learners’ individual needs! TED talks are mainly in English which make them a go-to ESL resource but there are a few foreign-language talks too. The one above is a firm fave of mine addressing the status of English as a global language and the harm it may be doing – guaranteed to get even the most reticent second-language speakers talking!

Once I’ve selected a talk, I’ll use a range of techniques to approach the video. I might begin by discussing issues around the selected theme, then watch the video once in order to establish its gist. I’ll then do a second watch with some more detailed questions to answer, and end with sharing views on the speaker’s position or (if it’s a larger class) a debate. TED also include transcripts of all their talks, which are useful for detailed listening practice and language study. As an added bonus, you’ll find all kinds of accents and dialects in the talks, which is great for reinforcing the concept of World English and introducing learners to new sounds and expressions.

The News

We tend to use a mix of target-language clips like this one (ie those for and by speakers of the foreign language) and those specially created for language learners, like A la Une, above. Resources like these are great for leading engaging sessions around current affairs and present the opportunity to learn and practice grammar and vocabulary in a meaningful context. Research shows that this makes it much easier to remember, which is great news for our learners!

Infographics

Similarly to picture books, these are a great way to build confidence for lower-level learners as they tend to use minimal words and focus on visual images. For this reason, we often like to play the infographic with the sound off to begin with, allowing learners to glean and discuss the overall meaning of the clip, before adding the sound and moving onto a more detailed discussion of the information.

To state the obvious, infographics are particularly useful to quickly show learners concepts or processes that might be boring or time-heavy to explain in words, and will definitely not appeal to visual learners. To this end, I’ve used infographics to introduce learners to the difference between England, Britain and the UK (tricksy distinctions for non-Europeans in particular – my Korean students were surprised to learn they were not one and the same!) or to processes like the water cycle in the clip above.

Lucy McCormick is Head of Client Services at Struck Fluent, a community of tutors specialising in Modern Foreign Languages and ESL. She has extensive experience as a teacher and tutor of French and ESL in the UK, China, Korea, Vietnam and India. When not teaching or language geeking, you can generally find her in the company of a book, a gin or (preferably) both.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Teaching Materials Series: Picture Books

Welcome to our new blog series! Here we will be introducing some of our most commonly used teaching materials and how we use them. As always we welcome your feedback and – for the teachers among you – if you have any ideas to suggest, we’d love to hear them (and add them to our stash!)

This week we’re talking picture books. At Struck Fluent, these are an essential part of our repertoire with Young Learners. We use a mixture of classic English books in translation and original foreign-language texts, and both always go down a storm. As well as being fun, interactive and supportive of our students’ school learning, there are tons of benefits to using picture books when learning a foreign language. These include:

Visual cues

vhc

Even children with no former experience of a language can follow a story from the pictures, and learn to positively identify the new language with a fun activity. As the children progress, they begin to link word and image: one of my 5-year-old French students loves counting and naming the fruit in La Chenille qui fait des trous (The Very Hungry Caterpillar), for example. All along, they are developing listening skills: becoming used to the rhythm and flow of the language and later being able to pick out and identify words and phrases.

Motivation to speak

grass

A new language can feel overwhelming, and even at a young age children have often internalised a fear of ‘getting it wrong’ which causes them to hold back from speaking in sessions. In picture books, language is stripped back to its bare essentials and accompanied by bright, attractive pictures which enable children to follow the story (as discussed above). The language used also tends to be fun and enticing: children love making the different sounds of the grass, mud and snowstorm in foreign-langauge versions of We’re going on a Bear Hunt, or joining their tutor in shouting ‘Va-t’en!’ to the big green monster in Va-t’en, Grand Monstre Vert. Much like songs and chants – other mainstays of our Young Learner sessions – children need no encouragement to repeat the sounds, words and phrases they discover in picture books. Way more effective –  and most importantly way more fun – than drilling vocab!

Introducing and supporting new language

Once children are comfortable with their tutor and the new language, picture books can support a range of learning objectives: this week, for example, I have used La Surprise de Handa to focus on animals and fruit, and Je m’habille et je te croque (see video above) to introduce clothes. Linguists have long trumpeted the benefits of learning a language in context in order to help it stick in the mind, and stories are a perfect context for Young Learners.Often, if children are struggling to remember a word I can prompt them with a scene from the story we’ve read (what fruit did the ostrich steal from Handa?) and they will be delighted to find they can remember the French for guava after all!

Lucy McCormick is Head of Client Services at Struck Fluent, a community of tutors specialising in Modern Foreign Languages and ESL. She has extensive experience as a teacher and tutor of French and ESL in the UK, China, Korea, Vietnam and India. When not teaching or language geeking, you can generally find her in the company of a book, a gin or (preferably) both.

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,