Tag Archives: technology

Top Three Language Learning Apps

At Struck Fluent, we’re avid students as well as teachers of languages. In addition to keeping up the languages we teach, we are currently enjoying expanding our horizons into a range of languages from Serbian to Classical Tibetan.

As such, we’re constantly seeking new and innovative ways to help us along the road to fluency. The tech age has been revolutionary in this respect: an explosive range of language-learning apps has meant that the days of mind-numbing hours spent rote-learning vocab are long gone (Hallelujah!), and finding native speakers to practice with is easier than ever before. Below we introduce our top three apps – hope you find them as useful as we have!

  1. Duolinguo

Top of the download list, Duolinguo users rave about its masterful gamification of the language learning process. It’s a simple yet addictive app that aims to help you use language skillfully rather than just learning reams of vocab: two of our favourite features are the ‘Stories’ section, where you read and answer questions on a story to boost your comprehension skills, and the speaking/listening practice using your phone’s microphone to listen and check pronunciation.

We also really like that Duolinguo’s courses are created by native speakers and not aimed exclusively at first-language English speakers. Gives us a warm, fuzzy, anti-colonial kinda feeling.

2. Memrise

Memrise uses similar tactics to Duolinguo in that it’s gamified to the max: you score points at each stage of the course which position you on a global leaderboard. However, it’s very much a vocab app: the courses are created by the user community who also generate and share memes that have helped them remember individual words. Some of these are absolutely genius: the Chinese character for ‘capital’ (the ‘jing’ in ‘Beijing’) looks like this:  京. It is is made up of three parts stacked on top of each other:

–  亠 is a radical (it has no meaning on its own but is a part of quite a few characters – kind of vaguely like silent letters in English). It gets called a ‘lid’.

– 口 means ‘mouth’

 – 小 means ‘small’

So the way to remember it is that the Chinese capital keeps a lid on the mouths of the small people. Make of that what you will!

3. HelloTalk

Essentially pen-pals for the digital age, HelloTalk links you up with speakers of the language(s) you want to learn and lets you chat WhatsApp-style through texts and voice messages. The basic version is free and allows you to list one language that you speak and one you wish to learn, but if you upgrade to the paid version you can list more. It has a built-in dictionary feature which is great for quickly checking and using words in context – proven to help you internalise vocab more quickly!

What do you think of our top three? Are there any you think should be here? Let us know! We love hearing from you lovely lot.

Lucy McCormick is Head of Client Services at Struck Fluent, a community of tutors specialising in Modern Foreign Languages and ESL. She has extensive experience as a teacher and tutor of French and ESL in the UK, China, Korea, Vietnam and India. When not teaching or language geeking, you can generally find her in the company of a book, a gin or (preferably) both.

 

 

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Teaching Materials Series: Videos

People get tetchy at the mention of using videos in the classroom – and sure, there’s little educational value in learners zoning out in front of a cartoon with no context! But done right, video is a great way to engage learners, enlarge their horizons and – our crucial aim here at Struck Fluent – encourage them to produce language.

Here are a few of our fave video resources and how we use them:

TED talks

A language teacher’s manna from heaven, TED offer engaging material on a host of topics from social issues to environmental concerns; from philosophy to the latest scientific research. In other words, material to suit the needs and interests of every learner – this is great news for us as we’re all about tailoring our sessions to learners’ individual needs! TED talks are mainly in English which make them a go-to ESL resource but there are a few foreign-language talks too. The one above is a firm fave of mine addressing the status of English as a global language and the harm it may be doing – guaranteed to get even the most reticent second-language speakers talking!

Once I’ve selected a talk, I’ll use a range of techniques to approach the video. I might begin by discussing issues around the selected theme, then watch the video once in order to establish its gist. I’ll then do a second watch with some more detailed questions to answer, and end with sharing views on the speaker’s position or (if it’s a larger class) a debate. TED also include transcripts of all their talks, which are useful for detailed listening practice and language study. As an added bonus, you’ll find all kinds of accents and dialects in the talks, which is great for reinforcing the concept of World English and introducing learners to new sounds and expressions.

The News

We tend to use a mix of target-language clips like this one (ie those for and by speakers of the foreign language) and those specially created for language learners, like A la Une, above. Resources like these are great for leading engaging sessions around current affairs and present the opportunity to learn and practice grammar and vocabulary in a meaningful context. Research shows that this makes it much easier to remember, which is great news for our learners!

Infographics

Similarly to picture books, these are a great way to build confidence for lower-level learners as they tend to use minimal words and focus on visual images. For this reason, we often like to play the infographic with the sound off to begin with, allowing learners to glean and discuss the overall meaning of the clip, before adding the sound and moving onto a more detailed discussion of the information.

To state the obvious, infographics are particularly useful to quickly show learners concepts or processes that might be boring or time-heavy to explain in words, and will definitely not appeal to visual learners. To this end, I’ve used infographics to introduce learners to the difference between England, Britain and the UK (tricksy distinctions for non-Europeans in particular – my Korean students were surprised to learn they were not one and the same!) or to processes like the water cycle in the clip above.

Lucy McCormick is Head of Client Services at Struck Fluent, a community of tutors specialising in Modern Foreign Languages and ESL. She has extensive experience as a teacher and tutor of French and ESL in the UK, China, Korea, Vietnam and India. When not teaching or language geeking, you can generally find her in the company of a book, a gin or (preferably) both.

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