Language Learning around the World: The Persian Gulf

Over the last few years, the ESL industry in the Gulf states has exploded: look at any TEFL recruitment board and it’s not hard to see why native English-speaking teachers are being drawn to Saudi Arabia and the UAE in particular: if you can hack the restrictions on women and alcohol-based socialising, the tax-free salaries are astonishing and afford a standard of living that is certainly unachievable at home, but also in other popular TEFL destinations such as East and South East Asia. So why the gold rush? Unsurprisingly, it’s intimately connected to the employment market.

Improving standards at home

The Education First English Proficiency Index places Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Oman, Qatar and Kuwait among the lowest of their world rankings. Governments and students across the region are acutely aware of the opportunities English proficiency may bring (British Council research shows that employees from the Middle East with good English earn up to three times as much as non-English speakers), but lack of resources in state education often limits access to education to those able to afford private tuition. As a result of this, several countries across the region have partnered with the British Council in recent years in order to improve the reach and standards of English teaching.

Focusing on opportunities overseas

In addition, a number of government-funded schemes intended to help citizens learn English overseas have come to prominence in recent years, not least Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah Scholarship Programme (KASP). The fact that Saudi Arabian students made up the highest percentage of students in US intensive English courses with about 38,000 English students – or double the number of students from China, which is often assumed to be the biggest ESL market – is a good example of the region’s commitment to English language learning

Effects in the region

So what does this mean for the Gulf? It certainly seems that proficiency is set to increase, and with it employment prospects and economic growth. However, there are those that worry for the future of the Arabic language as English becomes more widespread – especially among the middle classes. Patricia Ryan, an English teacher with the British Council, makes a particularly rousing call for the preservation of Arabic among other languages in her TED talk ‘Don’t Insist on English’ and this Fortune article has dire warnings for the future of Arabic in an English-focused world.

Links with language learning in the UK

This last concern speaks to the current climate of Anglocentrism which has seen European and East Asian countries develop equally ambiguous relationships with the English language and its cultures. It’s something that we at Struck Fluent feel strongly about – with most of the world bilingual, and a great many of them using our own language proficiently, we and our children are at a distinct disadvantage both professionally and holistically without a second language. With the rise of China and Brexit on the horizon, can we afford to remain monolingual? We don’t think so.

Do you agree? If so, contact us and let us help you with your language learning goals! Feel free to leave your comments below too – we always love to hear from you.

Lucy McCormick is Head of Client Services at Struck Fluent, a community of tutors specialising in Modern Foreign Languages and ESL. She has extensive experience as a teacher and tutor of French and ESL in the UK, China, Korea, Vietnam and India. When not teaching or language geeking, you can generally find her in the company of a book, a gin or (preferably) both.

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